Indonesia

Peoples Under Threat Ranking:
#51
18

Communities at risk

Acehnese, Chinese, Dayaks, Madurese, Papuans, religious minorities

Summary

Indonesia’s human rights situation deteriorated worryingly in the latter half of 2019. After West Papuan students were subjected to a racist attack in Surabaya in August, mass pro-independence protests and riots broke out in Papua and West Papua provinces, adding fuel to a mostly low-level insurgency underway for decades. The government of President Joko ‘Jokowi’… Read more »

Peoples Under Threat Data

2020 Data Peoples under Threat value
Self-determination conflicts4
Major armed conflict1
Prior genocide / politicide1
Flight of refugees and IDPs0.0000
Legacy of vengeance - group grievance7.4
Rise of factionalized elites7.1
Voice and Accountability0.180
Political Stability-0.533
Rule of Law-0.315
OECD country risk classification3
TOTAL10.21

The overall measure for each country is based on a basket of 10 indicators. The number in each row is drawn from the source for that particular indicator. The sources of data and calculations used are detailed on the Notes to Table page. 

Background

Indonesia’s human rights situation deteriorated worryingly in the latter half of 2019. After West Papuan students were subjected to a racist attack in Surabaya in August, mass pro-independence protests and riots broke out in Papua and West Papua provinces, adding fuel to a mostly low-level insurgency underway for decades. The government of President Joko ‘Jokowi’ Widodo, who won re-election in April 2019, responded by sending more than 6,000 soldiers and police to quell the unrest, leading to the deaths of more than 50 people. Further instability came during largest nationwide protests in decades – a response to proposed laws weakening anti-corruption
measures and diminishing basic freedoms and protections for minority groups, who already face oppressive blasphemy laws. ISIS-inspired militants also continue carrying out periodic deadly attacks against security forces and civilians. With one of the world’s highest mortality rates, Indonesia’s hands-off approach to COVID-19 appears to be entrenching an intertwined economic/public health crisis.