El Salvador

Peoples Under Threat Ranking:
#43
8

Summary

El Salvador ranked 43rd in 2019’s Peoples under Threat index and rose 8 places from 2017’s ranking. In El Salvador, national security is threatened by high levels of killings linked to gang violence with its roots in late-1990s US deportation policies. Criminal gangs have committed an array of human rights abuses, including murder of journalists,… Read more »

Peoples Under Threat Data

2019 Data Peoples under Threat value
Self-determination conflictsNo data
Major armed conflict2
Prior genocide / politicide1
Flight of refugees and IDPs0.0
Legacy of vengeance - group grievance6.4
Rise of factionalized elites4.3
Voice and Accountability0.153
Political Stability-0.247
Rule of Law-0.856
OECD country risk classification5
TOTAL10.69

The overall measure for each country is based on a basket of 10 indicators. The number in each row is drawn from the source for that particular indicator. The sources of data and calculations used are detailed on the Notes to Table page. 

Background

El Salvador ranked 43rd in 2019’s Peoples under Threat index and rose 8 places from 2017’s ranking.

In El Salvador, national security is threatened by high levels of killings linked to gang violence with its roots in late-1990s US deportation policies. Criminal gangs have committed an array of human rights abuses, including murder of journalists, government officials and security personnel. They have also perpetrated widespread sexual violence and recruitment of children. Government efforts to address deep-seated socio-economic issues underlying the proliferation of gang violence have come up short, as have heavy-handed, militarized repression tactics, which have further victimized many Salvadorians. In 2018, the number of missing persons reached a new high at nearly 3,400 cases. Internal displacement resulting from gang violence has recently become a major issue, with civil society and international organizations placing the number of affected people in the tens or hundreds of thousands. It remains to be seen whether Nayib Bukele, a social media star who became President in February 2018, can parlay his massive popularity into productive policy.