Cameroon

Peoples Under Threat Ranking:
#17
14

Communities at risk

'Westerners' , Southerners

Summary

Cameroon ranked 17th in 2019’s Peoples under Threat index and rose 14 places from 2018’s ranking. After a worrying trend in recent years, Cameroon has leapt up the index amid sharply escalating political violence in the country’s north-west and south-west regions. Peaceful demonstrations in 2016 against decades-old political and economic marginalization of the country’s Anglophone regions… Read more »

Peoples Under Threat Data

2019 Data Peoples under Threat value
Self-determination conflicts5
Major armed conflict2
Prior genocide / politicideNo data
Flight of refugees and IDPs0.0
Legacy of vengeance - group grievance8.4
Rise of factionalized elites9.1
Voice and Accountability-1.049
Political Stability-1.085
Rule of Law-1.024
OECD country risk classification6
TOTAL14.94

The overall measure for each country is based on a basket of 10 indicators. The number in each row is drawn from the source for that particular indicator. The sources of data and calculations used are detailed on the Notes to Table page. 

Background

Cameroon ranked 17th in 2019’s Peoples under Threat index and rose 14 places from 2018’s ranking.

After a worrying trend in recent years, Cameroon has leapt up the index amid sharply escalating political violence in the country’s north-west and south-west regions. Peaceful demonstrations in 2016 against decades-old political and economic marginalization of the country’s Anglophone regions by the French-dominated government has led to a separatist movement for an independent state, Ambazonia. Thousands of people have been killed or disappeared at the hands of government forces and numerous emerging separatist groups, who have committed a range of abuses, often against civilians. At the same time, Boko Haram attacks persist in the far north, adding to the growing numbers of IDPs and a deepening humanitarian crisis. President Paul Biya, in power since 1982, has labelled the separatists as terrorists and social media ‘a new form of terrorism’. Facing prolonged internet shutdowns and scant international attention, protesters, and later separatists, have relied heavily on Twitter hashtags to mobilize.