Turkey

Peoples Under Threat Ranking:
#33
19

Communities at risk

Kurds, Alevis, Roma, Armenians and other Christians

Summary

The position of Turkey as the foremost host of refugees from the Syrian conflict – and venue for the first World Humanitarian Summit – has drawn international attention away from its own deadly civil war. Hostilities between the Turkish government and the Kurdistan Workers’ Party (PKK) escalated dramatically from mid 2015, triggered by devastating ISIS… Read more »

Peoples Under Threat Data

2016 Data Peoples under Threat value
Self-determination conflicts5
Major armed conflict2
Prior genocide / politicideNo data
Flight of refugees and IDPs0.0009
Legacy of vengeance - group grievance9
Rise of factionalized elites7.3
Voice and Accountability-0.322
Political Stability-1.059
Rule of Law0.037
OECD country risk classification4
TOTAL11.58

The overall measure for each country is based on a basket of 10 indicators. The number in each row is drawn from the source for that particular indicator. The sources of data and calculations used are detailed on the Notes to Table page. 

Background

The position of Turkey as the foremost host of refugees from the Syrian conflict – and venue for the first World Humanitarian Summit – has drawn international attention away from its own deadly civil war. Hostilities between the Turkish government and the Kurdistan Workers’ Party (PKK) escalated dramatically from mid 2015, triggered by devastating ISIS suicide bombings in Suruc and Ankara in which each side accused the other of being complicit. By the end of the year, Kurdish militants had declared autonomy in a number of districts in Sirnak, Mardin and Diyarbakir, and Turkish armed forces were subjecting Kurdish-majority towns to military assault with tanks, helicopters and fighter jets. Meanwhile the Peoples’ Democratic Party (HDP), which had fared well enough in June elections to deny the ruling Justice and Development Party (AKP) an absolute majority, was subjected to heavy repression, effectively denying much of Turkey’s Kurdish population a democratic voice.