India

Peoples Under Threat Ranking:
#54
16

Communities at risk

Assamese, Bodos, Nagas, Tripuras, other Adivasis, Kashmiris, Sikhs, Muslims, Dalits

Summary

India ranked 54th in 2019’s Peoples under Threat index and rose 16 places from 2018’s ranking. India has been embroiled in escalating violence in Kashmir since 2016, when soldiers killed a separatist commander with a major social media following among alienated locals. With stepped-up Indian army operations, 2018 saw the highest death toll in a decade… Read more »

Peoples Under Threat Data

2019 Data Peoples under Threat value
Self-determination conflicts5
Major armed conflict2
Prior genocide / politicideNo data
Flight of refugees and IDPs0.0
Legacy of vengeance - group grievance8.3
Rise of factionalized elites7.3
Voice and Accountability0.386
Political Stability-0.826
Rule of Law0.005
OECD country risk classification3
TOTAL9.91

The overall measure for each country is based on a basket of 10 indicators. The number in each row is drawn from the source for that particular indicator. The sources of data and calculations used are detailed on the Notes to Table page. 

Background

India ranked 54th in 2019’s Peoples under Threat index and rose 16 places from 2018’s ranking.

India has been embroiled in escalating violence in Kashmir since 2016, when soldiers killed a separatist commander with a major social media following among alienated locals. With stepped-up Indian army operations, 2018 saw the highest death toll in a decade as well as greater collaboration between several Islamist separatist groups. Indian security forces have enjoyed impunity for a range of human rights violations in Kashmir and elsewhere, such as the ‘Northeast’ states and in Naxalite-Maoist areas, fighting worsened in 2018. In the lead-up to the 2019 general elections, social media played a central role in advancing chauvinist Hindu nationalism in a climate of paranoia and intolerance towards minorities and perceived outsiders. While WhatsApp rumours had already led to deadly mob violence by extremist Hindu groups, members of the ruling Bharatiya Janata Party (BJP), supporters and bots ratcheted up the production of inflammatory, anti-Muslim messaging on- and offline. The BJP President Amit Shah called Bangladeshi migrants ‘termites’ and the party’s Twitter account echoed his words: with the exception of Buddhists, Hindus and Sikhs, ‘we will remove every single infiltrator from the country’.